Ruined Wedding Dresses Spark Outrage


When a woman puts on a wedding dress, she may be speechless, cry or scream for joy, but regardless of her reaction, it is always magical. It is a moment that every woman deserves to feel. That is probably why many people were confused about what went on outside of a bridal shop that was preparing to close down back in December of last year.

Onlookers were horrified that someone was spray painting thousands of dollars worth of wedding dresses and formal gowns and then throwing them into a dumpster outside of a Priscilla of Boston boutique in Edina, Minn. Among them was a $6,000 Vera Wang creation and various other high-dollar gowns.

Priscilla of Boston is owned by David’s Bridal, and after 65 years in business, they announced that they would be closing down all 19 salon locations. The chain closed Friday, Dec. 30 2011.

The thing people could not wrap their head around was the way this boutique in Edina opted to handle its unsold merchandise. Some people ran to the site in an effort to salvage what they could. TODAY.com claimed a woman by the name of Sheila Roth managed to snap photos, which she later sent out to local TV stations.

According to TODAY.com, KARE – TV contacted Priscilla of Boston and received this statement in response:

“Priscilla of Boston has always donated quality bridal gowns to a variety of charitable causes. We do not, however, donate unsaleable dresses that are damaged, soiled or in otherwise poor condition.”

Reports from KARE-TV said that women who witnessed the purposeful destruction noticed that the dresses were in perfect condition; some were still in boxes.

Recycled Bride founder Tracy DiNunzio told TODAY.com that (her website) is a site that allows people to buy and sell gently used wedding dresses and other wedding items.

“When you think of all the resources that go into producing these dresses, and how many ways they could benefit someone, it’s quite sad,” DiNunzio continued. “Why didn’t they donate them to Brides Against Breast Cancer, or Wish Upon a Wedding? So wasteful!”

Retail analyst and author of “Black Market Billions” Hitha Prabhakar told TODAY that the spray painting might have been done to protect the dress designs. She added that sometimes, designers are concerned with their dresses being counterfeited, so this might have been their solution .

Due to the amount of criticism this incident sparked, David’s Bridal issued this statement to TODAY.com apologizing for this boutique’s actions:

“Like many of you, we were disheartened by imagery of a small number of unsold bridal gowns being destroyed following a Priscilla of Boston salon closure in the Midwest. As the parent company of Priscilla of Boston, we fully understand the anger and frustration that many people are feeling about this occurrence.

“While it has been Priscilla of Boston’s policy not to make donations of sample dresses that are in poor condition, we recognize that some of these dresses could possibly have gone to worthy causes. David’s Bridal has already begun bringing together all of the remaining Priscilla of Boston gowns to evaluate them and ensure that they are donated to our charitable partners wherever possible.

“From all of us at David’s Bridal, we truly appreciate hearing your sentiments. We believe that every bride deserves a beautiful gown, and we will continue to honor that commitment.”

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Article by Clarissa Tapia for Phoenix Fashion Week

“The Resource For All Things Fashionable”

http://www.phoenixfashionweek.com

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